4duino – Arduino Uno Compatible Products

4duino – Arduino Uno Compatible Products

Range01a

Purchase 4duino here

4tronix have started building a range of Arduino compatible boards with our own brand of magic.

All 4 of the current members of this new range are fully compatible with Arduino Uno software, and the 2 larger Uno form factor boards are fully hardware compatible as well

In addition, the 4duino range features:

  • 16MHz ATMega328P-AU processors
  • 14 Digital I/O pins (5 of which can be PWM – Pulse Width Modulated)
  • 8 Analog input pins (6 of which can be Digital I/O as well)
  • Built-in 5V regulators (check individual specifications for current ratings)
  • Reset buttons
  • Full USB interface (using CH340 interface chip)
  • Micro-USB connector

The 4duino Uno full-size products also have:

  • DC Jack for powering via up to 11V
  • Coloured coded pins (Pro) or available holes for 3-pin sensors (GVS – Ground, Volts, Signal) for all 22 I/O pins

 

Download the CH340 Drivers for your OS

 

4duino Uno

IMG_1548d

This is software and hardware compatible with an Arduino Uno. You can use all the same addon Shields and get the same performance. In addition, we have made the extra 2 Analog pins available via the holes on the board into which you can solder headers if required.

These extra analog pins can be used within the Arduino IDE as A6 and A7. Note that they are analog ONLY – there is no ability to do a digital read or write on them and there is no ability to set pullup resistors.

Currently, the 4duino Uno is a depopulated 4duino Uno Pro board – so you can upgrade it to the full Pro specification with some surface mount soldering! Adding the GVS headers is much easier and a great upgrade though.

The USB interface is via the CH340 chip which has drivers available for all operating systems here.

On board 5V regulator: 1A

 

4duino Uno Pro

IMG_1548c

This is the fully populated version of the board that includes an integrated 2-channel H-bridge motor driver (the DRV8833).

The 4duino Uno Pro is fully hardware and software compatible with an Arduino Uno. You can use all the same addon Shields and get the same performance. In addition we have added colour-coded GVS headers for all the I/O pins including the additional 2 analog pins, A6 and A7. Note that these additional analog pins are analog ONLY – there is no ability to do a digital read or write on them and there is no ability to set pullup resistors.

The great news is that the Pro version also includes 2-channel full H-bridge motor driver so you can control motors without requiring any addition shields or messy wiring. In fact, with the GVS headers installed, together with the motor drivers, the 4duino Uno Pro is like combing an Uno, sensor shield and motor shield into a single board!

On board 5V regulator: 1A

Motor control Pins:

  • Motor 0:  D5, D9
  • Motor 1:  D6, D10

 

4duino Mini

IMG_1571a

The 4duino Mini is an extremely small version of the Arduino Uno with all the same I/O pins, USB interface, reset button and voltage regulator.

All 22 I/O pins are brought out to the board edge where you can connect directly to them or solder in the provided headers.

The extra 2 analog pins can be used within the Arduino IDE as A6 and A7. Note that they are analog ONLY – there is no ability to do a digital read or write on them and there is no ability to set pullup resistors.

It is intended that headers, if fitted, are fitted so that the underside of the board is visible during use. This side of the board has no components and so has more room for labelling of all the pins.

Certain pins have symbols around them:

  • Circle: this is a digital pin that is capable of PWM
  • Octagon:  These are the Ground connections
  • Square:  One of these is 5V and is either a 5V input to the board, or a 5V output if you are using the onboard 5V regulator. The other square is the VIN for the voltage regulator. This can be from 6V to 9V. So if you are using this board with 4xAA batteries you would have a 6V nominal voltage which you apply to the VIN and GND inputs. You can then use the 5V pin to power the rest of your ciruit (up to 150mA)

On board 5V voltage regulator:  150mA

  • Dimensions: 33.75 x 18.5 x 1mm
  • Weight: 2g

 

4duino Mini Pro

IMG_1678a

The 4duino Mini Pro is a slightly longer version of the 4duino Mini. The extra length is used to house the dual H-Bridge motor driver and associated components, as well as the motor power input and motor power outputs. The remainder of the board is identical to the 4duino Mini

All 22 I/O pins are brought out to the board edge where you can connect directly to them or solder in the provided headers.

The extra 2 analog pins can be used within the Arduino IDE as A6 and A7. Note that they are analog ONLY – there is no ability to do a digital read or write on them and there is no ability to set pullup resistors.

It is intended that headers, if fitted, are fitted so that the underside of the board is visible during use. This side of the board has no components and so has more room for labelling of all the pins.

Certain pins have symbols around them:

  • Circle: this is a digital pin that is capable of PWM
  • Octagon:  These are the Ground connections
  • Square:  One of these is 5V and is either a 5V input to the board, or a 5V output if you are using the onboard 5V regulator. The other square is the VIN for the voltage regulator. This can be from 6V to 9V. So if you are using this board with 4xAA batteries you would have a 6V nominal voltage which you apply to the VIN and GND inputs. You can then use the 5V pin to power the rest of your ciruit (up to 150mA)

On board 5V voltage regulator:  500mA (peak)

  • Dimensions: 43.75 x 18.5 x 1mm
  • Weight: 2.6g

Motor control Pins:

  • Motor 2:  D5, D9 (labelled on PCB as M2, but is M0 to be consistent with 4duino Uno Pro)
  • Motor 1:  D6, D10
  • The + and – pins on the opposite side from the Motor pins are what is used to power the motors. You need to wire these to your board power input or raw 5V or whatever if you need to power the motors.

 

Santa16

Santa16 – A robotic advent calendar for December 2016

santa16

During the first 24 days of December you will get a part each day to help you assemble the robot. Things will start happening about half-way through, but the final part on 24th December is worth waiting for as it will unlock the power of the robot!

The following links provide you with the instructions you need to assemble and use the robot.

Happy Christmas!

 

Ar2Pi2 – Dual Mode Robot – Arduino vs Raspberry Pi

Ar2Pi2 – The Robot That Can be Arduino or Raspberry Pi

(Previously known as BotZero)

Click on any photo to enlarge.

botzero03a

Ar2Pi2 as an Arduino Uno compatible robot

 

botzero07

Ar2Pi2 as a Raspberry Pi robot

 

Overview

Ar2Pi2 is a tiny robot that fits well inside the boundaries of an A6 sheet of paper (148 x 105mm). This makes it ideal for Micro Pi Noon and other small robot competitions.

Including the wheels it is 110 x 90mm and is 60mm high

The robot contains an ATMega328 which can be programmed over the USB interface just like an Arduino Uno. The robot is then fully programmable using any of the standard Arduino methods. A simple demo program is BotZMotor.ino

Alternatively, you can program the ATMega328 with the BotZero01.ino code and plug in your Raspberry Pi Zero and use the Pi to control the robot. This is very similar to the way our Picon Zero intelligent robotic controller works (in fact they share a lot of the same code). In this Raspberry Pi mode, there is a full Python library to enable you to control everything on the robot from python running on the Pi

The whole robot is powered by 3 AA cells. There is an onboard “boost” regulator to generate the 5V needed for the Pi.

 

Features

  • Hardware controlled by ATMega328
  • Powered by 3xAA batteries
  • 6 x RGB pixels (mini “neopixels”)
  • 2 x Analog light sensors
  • 2 x Analog line following sensors
  • 2 x DC motors fitted in servo cases
  • Large 60mm diameter wheels
  • Front smooth running caster
  • USB interface to the ATMega328
  • 4 x general purpose I/O lines with GVS (Ground, Volts, Signal) 3-pin connections. These can be Digital or Analog etc (just like Picon Zero)
  • On/Off switch
  • Special fitting for Micro Pi Noon balloon holder and popper (If this is fitted, the 4 I/O lines GVS pins cannot be used)
  • Designed for Raspberry Pi Zero, but other Raspberry Pis could be fitted by using a suitable extension header

 

Pictorial Overview

botzero05a

 

Assembling the Kit

Step 1 – Attach the Bottom plate and mounting pillars

step01a

Check you have the bottom mounting plate, 2 pan-head screws and 2 10mm pillars

step01b

Orient the bottom plate so the holes clear the soldered components as shown

step01c

Push the screws through the bottom plate and the main board, then screw into the 10mm pillars

step01d

 

Step 2 – Attach the Motors

step02a

All you need is the motors. Ensure the wires exit from the back of the motors and the red wires are both on the inside as shown

step02b

Carefully twist the wires so they fit between the motors, ensuring they don’t go over the motors

 

Step 3 – Fit the Battery Holder

step03a

You’ll need the battery holder and 2 countersink head screws

step03b

First connect the battery holder to the screw terminals. Red towards the rear, marked Vin

step03c

Twist the wires in between the 2 motors – again being careful that the wires do not get trapped between the motors and the battery holder. Warning: this is tricky! You can leave the wires out which is much easier, but it doesn’t look as tidy, so it is worth persevering.

 

Step 4 – Fit the Front Caster

step04a

Use the short 6mm screws (in the separate bag of screws and pillars) and note that the spacers provided with the caster are not required

step04b

With the ball out of the holder, push the screws through the black holder and through the PCB

step04c

Screw the nuts on tight

step04d

Finally, push the steel ball into the holder. It should snap tightly in and move very smoothly

 

Step 5 – Attach the Wheels

step05a

First stretch the tyres over the plastic wheels. Then push the wheels onto the shafts of the motors

step05b

Use the screws provided to tightly fix the wheels

 

Your Ar2Pi2 is ready to rock and roll!

Add batteries and switch it on to demo the LEDs and the motor operations. Next step, write some programs…

 

Download the python library and examples from here

 

 

Picobot 2

Overview

Picobot 2 is an all-new design, but recognisably similar to the original Picobot. Here are some of the key hardware differences:

  • Acrylic case for all models
  • Built-in LIPO battery and smart charger
  • USB interface for programming and charging
  • Supports Bluetooth Smart (Bluetooth Low Energy, BLE)
  • Supports Wifi using ESP8266 (NB. choice of Wifi or Bluetooth is a build-time option. One or the other, but not both)
  • Improved internal power supplies, keeps the ultrasonic sensor running even with low battery levels
  • Improved line follower and light sensors
  • Fully RoHS compliant

 

Links

 

Child-Friendly Assembly

It is *Really* simple to assemble the Picobot2. All you need is a small cross-head screwdriver and a few minutes.

pbstep01

Above shows all the parts that you receive in the box. Clockwise from top left:

  1. Picobot2 PCBA ready-assembled with motors
  2. LIPO battery (with protection circuitry)
  3. Wheels
  4. Screws and nuts
  5. Acrylic case (5 layers)

Visit this link to see the detailed assembly instructions

 

First Steps

When the Picobot2 is delivered, it contains 5 programs that you can access using the Mode button

1. Flashes the LEDs rapidly

2. Line Follower. Stick black insulation tape down and it should follow it (depends how reflective the surface it is on – fine on wooden floors!)

3. Light Follower. Follows a torch shining on it, but not very well at the moment

4. Obstacle avoider. When comes close to something, it reverses and turns around then moves off again

5. Person follower. Tries to stay at 10cm from an object. I need to slow down the movements as it is too jerky at present and goes off line.

The Mode button (right side, front) changes between these programs. When you press the button it will move onto the next one and flash the Blue LED the right number of times (ie. it will flash 3 times before running the light follower). The obstacle avoider program in particular doesn’t listen to the button very often, so you may have to hold it down for a couple of seconds before it reacts.

 

Know Your Picobot2

This image is from an earlier prototype, but gives the general picture – most of the electronics is on the underneath. The light sensors are on top at the front corners

 

Bluetooth Connection

The Bluetooth is a direct pass-through, with a small set of AT commands. So don’t start a packet with AT or it will be interpreted as a command. In the Arduino code you can open the software serial connection at 9600 baud, then read or write from it directly.

#include <SoftwareSerial.h>
SoftwareSerial BLE (2, 3); // RX, TX
  BLE.begin (9600);
BLE.println (“Hello world”);

 The AT commands are listed here

iOS (8 or later):  Use LightBlue app from the AppStore to find and listen or send data to the Picobot2: Tutorial

Android: Use the WIreless-Tag agg referred to in page 14 of the Bluetooth module specification here

 

ESP8266 Connection

There is an ESP-12E module used for WiFi and it is controlled via the Software Serial interface using AT commands.

With these AT commands you can connect to an existing WiFI network, create your own access point, or both. You can easily create a web server so that anyone with a WiFi enabled smartphone or PC can attach to your Picobot2 and control it, or simply receive updates about the sensors and what the Picobot2 is doing. It’s entirely up to you.

The AT commands are listed here

 

Latest Status

21st December: Released: Purchase here

  • Picobot2 is now released
  • Production capability is very limited at around 10 units per day, so if you order several there may be a delay before they are shipped
  • The second batch should be factory-produced and thus shipment in quantity will be possible
  • Once factory production is established, Picobot2 will be released to distributors

 

16th December: Released for pre-Order – Purchase here

  • PCBs have arrived as planned – Good News! They work 🙂
  • I thought when testing that there was a hardware problem, but after a lot of investigation, it turned out to be a problem with the new Arduino Picobot2 library code
  • This has delayed full testing, so there are things still to test such as Bluetooth, WiFI, voltage regulation, etc, but all is looking good so far
  • Now it is time to start planning the shipping roll-out. We’ve sold more than was expected so it is likely that later orders may not ship until the new year
  • We close for new orders on Monday 21st December, but will still ship outstanding paid for orders on 22nd December. After that we won’t be around
  • So if all goes to plan we will be able to ship the first order on 17th December. Other orders will follow in the order they were placed

 

13th December: Released for pre-Order – Purchase here

  • We now have the stencil which will enable solder pasting on the blank PCBs when they arrive
  • We also have the cases, with the 4tronix and Picobo2 logos etched into the top layer
  • PCBs have been manufactured and are on the way from China
  • PCBs expected on 16th December and should be tested and confirmed working the same day (cross all fingers, toes and any other appendages you have!)
  • So if all goes to plan we will be able to ship the first order on 17th December. Other orders will follow in the order they were placed

stencil

Metal foil solder stencil

 

case

New top layer with logo etching

 

3rd December: Released for pre-Order – Purchase here

  • For now, we have left off the new accelerometer because, to really be useful, it needs a lot more software support
  • Retail pricing (without Bluetooth or Wifi) is £36.00 + VAT
  • First production PCBs and cases have been ordered today
  • Arduino library code is being tidied up and documented fully
  • Still to do: Document use with Snap for Arduino and Blockly

 

19th November: The (hopefully) Final prototype PCBs due in today. To do:

  • Assemble and test the final prototypes
  • Decide which components to leave in or out (mainly, do we need the accelerometer?)
  • Work out final product cost and set distributor and retail pricing
  • Purchase the first small batch (100 units) of PCBs, cases and any other components we’re running short of
  • Keep working on software demos and libraries
  • Release for pre-order on our web-site

 

Assembling Picobot2

pb2_09

Assembling Picobot 2

Picobot2 has been designed to be easily assembled by children armed only with a small screwdriver. As long as you are gentle with the acrylic layers there should be no problems in assembly.

If you find an acrylic layer is not fitting properly then either you have the wrong layer, or (layer 2 only) it is upside down.

Click on any photo to enlarge.

 

Step 1 – Check you have all the parts

pbstep01

You should have (clockwise from top left):

  • Picobot mainboard with ultrasonic and motors attached. Optionally, you may have a Bluetooth module (shown above) or an ESP8266 WiFi module
  • LiPo battery (includes protection circuit and JST 2-pin 2mm connector)
  • 2 wheels (Yellow or Lilac)
  • 4 screws (M2.5, 22mm) and 4 nuts (M2.5)
  • Layer 5 (top) acrylic. 2mm thick
  • Layer 4 acrylic, 5mm
  • Layer 3 acrylic, 5mm
  • Layer 2 acrylic, 3mm (sits on component side of PCB)
  • Layer 1 acrylic, 3mm (Bottom – with front glider attached)

 

Step 2 – Place Layer 2 onto the PCB

pbstep02

Note that this layer only goes one way round as it weaves in and out of the components on the PCB.

This layer is quite fragile until it is assembled, do not bend it!

 

Step 3 – Place Layer 1 onto Layer 2

pbstep02

Layer contains the hemi-spherical glider, which acts as the front caster for the Picobot2

 

Step 4 – Turn over and Place Layer 3 Between the Motors

pbstep04

Layer 3 and Layer 4 are quite similar and both are 5mm thick. Layer 3 has a small cutout at the centre front where the ultrasonic module is mounted.

 

Step 5 – Add Layer 4 above Layer 3

pbstep05

This also fits between the motors and the top of this layer should be flush with the top of the motors

 

Step 5 – Plug in the Battery

pbstep06

Plug in the battery onto the main PCB then position it carefully into its cavity making sure that the antenna end (left side) of the Bluetooth or ESP8266 module is not covered by the battery

 

Step 6 – Add the Top Layer (Layer 5)

pbstep07

This top layer holds in the battery and the motors

 

Step 7 – Screw it all together

pbstep08

Do up all 4 screws. with the screw head at the top and the nut underneath the Picobot2. They don’t need to be done up very tightly, just tightening by hand is sufficient

 

Step 8 – Finally, push the wheel on

pbstep09

Put each wheel flat on the table and push the axle through the wheel until it is stopped by the table. The axle end should be flush with the outside of the wheel

 

You now have a fully functional (optionally WiFi or Bluetooth enabled) mini robot to program away with!

Initio Chassis Build

Building the Initio Chassis

step11a

As with all kits of this type, there are a variety of ways to put this together. The following steps assume you will be building one of our Arduino or Raspberry Pi kits.

1 What’s in the Box?

step01

The Initio chassis comprises the major parts:

  • Base chassis with fitted motors, gearbox, battery box, switch PCB and wheel sensors
  • Top plate
  • 4 wheels
  • 3 bags of screws (with labels)
  • Wires to connect to switch PCB depending on use
  • Wire tidies to keep your cabling neat
  • Bag of plastic pillars and brackets
  • Plastic plate to clip onto a mini-pan tilt

 

2. Which Screw is Which?

screws01b

From left to right:

  1. 36 screws for mounting the general purpose stand-offs etc. (you shouldn’t need these for the basic build, but 2 are used for mounting line followers)
  2. Three types of screws for sensors:
    1. 2 wide head screws for mounting obstacle sensor brackets (one each)
    2. 6 small screws for mounting the pan/tilt assembly (4) and mounting the saddle clamp to the pan/tilt plate (2)
    3. 4 long screws for mounting the line follower support pillars (2)
  3. Two types of screws for upper plate and controller
    1. 10 small screws for mounting the Arduino or Raspberry Pi (and L298N motor board if used)
    2. 8 wide head screws for mounting the upper plate

 

3. Connect Battery Cable to Switch PCB

step02

** It is very important to attach this to the correct connector as shown above  (labelled “batt”). Please double-check this before connecting batteries

On more recent units there are 2 connectors to the left of the battery connector on the switch board. They are both the same. Use one for the DC Jack and one for the bare-ended cables (if they are required for your build)

 

4. Fit the Line Follower Support Pillars

step03

There are six 40mm pillars in the kit. 4 of them have flattened ends and 2 of them are straight. The 4 with flattened ends are to support the upper plate, so select the 2 straight ones for this task.

step04

Use 2 long screws (3x12PB) from Bag2 and the 2 pillars

step05

Screw the pillars in place. Note: you can vary the separation of the line following sensors by mounting the pillars in different holes, or to a lesser extent by twisting them once fitted

 

5. Fit the Obstacle Sensor Brackets

step06

Use the 2 wide head screws (3x8PWB) and the two plastic mounting brackets

step07

Screw the brackets in as shown above. You may want to turn them slightly away from each other so it detects obstacles off to the sides

 

6. Fit the Upper Mounting Plate

step08

For this we will need the 8 longer screws with wide heads (3x10PWB) and the four 40mm pillars with flattened ends

step09

Screw the 4 pillars in tightly from underneath, ensuring that the flattened ends fit snugly into the recess in the plastic plate

step10

Ensure the flattened ends at the top of each pillar fit into the recesses in the top plate, then use the remaining 4 screws to tighten the plate in position

 

7. Chassis build is now complete

step11a

 

8. Fit your chosen controller

Note that there are many mounting positions that can accommodate a number of different boards from the Raspberry Pi, Arduino and other families. Depending which board is being fitted, some of the other pillars may need to be removed to avoid fouling on components underneath the boards. Simply snip off the unwanted pillars using side-cutters, nail clippers, or a sharp knife.

Some of the pillars that you are not screwing into should be left to support the board – only cut off the ones that are in the way

step12

Use the small screws (2.6x8PB)

Fitting an Arduino

step13

For the Uno, all 4 mountings can be used if desired. I generally use only 2

 

Fitting a Raspberry Pi Model B

step14

 

Fitting a Raspberry Pi Model B+

step15

 

 

Picobot: Low-Cost, Feature-Rich Arduino-Compatible Robot

Picobot – Low-Cost Open-Source Robot for Education and Fun!

pb1_02a

For little more than the cost of an Arduino Uno, you can buy a compatible product that works directly with the Arduino IDE and has built in motors, sensors and LEDs. You can add to this with plug-in modules for ultrasonic distance measurement and 2.4GHz wireless connectivity

Buy it here

Dimensions:
PCB 50 x 50mm
With wheels, width is 80mm
Including ultrasonic and rear LED, length is 75mm
Height without ultrasonic is diameter of wheels (42mm)
Height with Ultrasonic is 48mm

The circuit schematic and example code is Open Source and available for anyone to make their own. Licensed under Creative Commons BY-SA
The design files and basic program examples are on the 4tronix GitHub
The library and 3D printable case are from Martin Bateman

Also available as a Starter Pack with 2 Picobots, programming cable and batteries

Save even more by purchasing a Class Pack of 6 or more

Some example activities:
Without RF Connectivity:

  • Line following
  • Obstacle avoidance
  • Light seeking
  • Light avoiding
  • Colour reaction to environment Light vs Distance, Colour vs Light received, etc
  • Follow my leader (pulse the rear LED and get second Picobot to follow a pulsing white light)
  • Stay fixed distance from object/person – eg. get it to follow you around

With RF Connectivity:

  • Synchronise colours
  • Dance in sync
  • All follow the command of a leader
  • Send commands or data from a Raspberry Pi or PC
  • Classic swarming behaviour: react to alarms, searching, clustering, identifying

Video of Picobots preparing to follow each other

Base Model Comprises:

  • Ready assembled – just push on the wheels and screw in the front caster assembly
  • Arduino compatible ATMega328P-AU (with 2 additional analog inputs)
  • 2 x N20 geared motors with “biscuit” 42mm diameter wheels
  • 2 forward facing light sensors
  • 2 line sensors
  • 2 paired RGB LEDs underneath for mood lighting and status information depending how you want to program them – they both show the same colour, not independent
  • Rear facing bright white LED – useful for “follow my leader”
  • Mode selection button – general purpose input button that you can program yourself
  • On – Off switch
  • Reset button
  • Socket for ultrasonic distance sensor HC-SR04
  • Socket of 2.4GHz RF module – nRF24L01 or compatible
  • Socket for programming (requires a USB to serial converter such as a CP2102 module with DTR, must be pin for pin compatible with the one 4tronix sell)
  • NB. Basic model does not include battery or battery holder as you can use any LiPo or LiOn battery or battery holder with 2-pin JST plug (check the polarity)

Available Upgrades and Options:

  • Ultrasonic distance sensor HC-SR04
  • Programming module and USB cable (CP2102 USB to Serial converter)
  • 2.4GHz transceiver nRF24L01 or compatible (NB. this is not Bluetooth and a similar transceiver is required to connect to other devices)
  • 3-Cell AA battery holder
  • Lithium Ion battery (similar to PS3 controller batteries, but polarity is reversed)
  • Lithium polymer battery (various capacities)

Gallery

First Information for Picobot – Swarm Robots perhaps

Some early Info About the Picobot Robotics Project

pb01

 

I’ve been working on and off for a while on a small robot because:

  1. I want to make available a really cheap programmable robot for schools
  2. I would like to make one that can communicate with other robots, detect them and interact with them
  3. If they can be made cheaply enough then making a swarm of 10 or more becomes feasible

pb05

pb02

pb03

pb04

pb07

pb06

pb09

case01

pb10

 

This version of Picobot (V2) contains a small number of sensors as well as a connector for an NRF24L01 2.4GHz RF module. This is stupidly cheap RF module with a reasonable range and excellent support in the Arduino community.

  • Dimensions of PCB 50 x 50mm
  • Motors: 2 x N20 size with 70:1 reduction gears
  • Wheels: 42mm diameter
  • Front ball caster
  • ATmel ATMega328P -PU(DIP) controller chip with Arduino bootloader
  • Interface to CP2102 USB-serial converter (with auto-reset). Only one converter required for all your bots, no need to waste money (and board space) having one for each
  • Plug in socket for HC-SR04 ultrasonic distance sensor
  • 2 x LDR for light level sensors
  • Reset switch
  • Mode select switch (use in your programs how you like)
  • Micro-USB for power only – will work from 3.7V to 5.5V
  • On-Off switch

 

Next Revision is V3 – Updated Info

V3 adds the following – keeping the PCB the same size

  • TQFP package for the ATMega328P-AU (smaller, surface mount)
  • 2 x IR line follower sensors
  • 2 x RGB LEDs underneath at front
  • Rear bright white LED, used for follow-the-leader swarming
  • Change to use of 2-pin JST connector for direct powering from 3.7V Lipo battery
  • New, thinner 47mm diameter wheels

Picobot_04c