Monthly Archives: March 2014

Simple Raspberry Pi Traffic Lights

Using Breadboard, LED & Resistors to Create a Traffic Light Click on any image to enlarge Fritzing Diagram PiCard:   Assembling Hardware Pop the PiCard pinout display over the GPIO pins on your Raspberry Pi ® making sure that pin 2 is in the corner of the board. This allows you to easily see where […]

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Battery Power Issues for Small Robots on Raspberry Pi

Summary When using a robotics controller board with small DC motors on Raspberry Pi, you need to consider how you will power it in such a way as to minimise cost, weight, complexity and maximise flexibility, reliability and power. These two sets of requirements are not necessarily mutually inclusive. In this article, I discuss three […]

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Adding Shroud to Extended Headers

Why? Extended headers on Raspberry Pi addon boards are a boon as they allow you to connect additional wires, or even another addon board in some situations. The problem is they tend to be relatively weak and can get bent over easily. Also, it is easy to plug things onto the extension shifted left or […]

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MicRoCon Robotics Controller Links

Links for the Various Resources Purchase MicRoCon Assemble MicRoCon Know your MicRoCon (pinouts etc,) Software (shares same pins as PiRoCon 1.2 and so the same code will work unchanged – Use “AddOn=PiRoConB” in Scratch GPIO)  

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Getting to Know Your MicRoCon

MicRoCon – Micro Robotics Controller for Raspberry Pi This is the baby sister to our full-featured PiRoCon controller board. It still features two bi-directional motor controllers, a 5V regulator for the Raspberry Pi as well as general purpose IO connectors, 5V servo outputs and a 4-pin Ultrasonic input. Motors A & B Motor A: Pins 24, […]

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PiDie Add-On Board Links

Links for Various Resources for the 4tronix PiRoCon Purchase PiDie Soldering the PiDie kit Connecting and using PiDie Scratch GPIO and Python software examples  

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Using the PiDie Raspberry Pi Addon Board

Overview There are 9 LEDs arranged in a 3×3 matrix: 1, 2, 3 down left side (Red, Yellow, Green – ideal for use as traffic lights) 4 in centre (Green) 5, 6, 7 down right side (Yellow, White, Blue) These 7 LEDs then form the dots on a dice. The matrix is completed with LED8 […]

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