Adafruit

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  • 2-Pin Mini Slim Tact Switch - Pack of 4 (TACTSLIM)
    Pack of 4 slim tactile push button switches. Suitable for breadboards or use with the Pi TFT Screen

    Slim clicky momentary switches are standard input "buttons" on electronic projects. These are half the width of classic 6mm tactile switches so they line up better on a breadboard, just plug them into every-other row. These work best in a PCB but can be used on a solderless breadboard as shown in this tutorial. The two pins are normally open (disconnected) and when the button is pressed they are momentarily closed.
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    £1.00
  • Adafruit Wearable On/Off Switch with Leads (TACTWEAR)
    Adafruit Wearable Tactile On/Off Switch

    Squeeze once to turn on, squeeze again to turn off! This clicky switch makes a great power switch or mode toggler. We like this switch because it's easy to embed in a seam for easily powering up/off wearable and fabric projects. Can handle up to 14V and 2 Amps! This is a really satisfying switch.
    • Length of wires: 117mm / 4.6"
    • Thickness: 8.4mm / 0.33"
    • Length: 18.2mm / 0.72"
    • Width: 15.43mm / 0.6"
    • Weight: 4.39g
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    £3.00
  • Adafruit USB LiPo Charger (ADA-CHGLIPO)
    Adafruit Micro LiPo - USB LiIon/LiPoly Charger

    Oh so adorable, this is the tiniest little lipo charger, so handy you can keep it any project box! Its also easy to use. Simply plug in the gold plated contacts into any USB port and a 3.7V/4.2V lithium polymer or lithium ion rechargeable battery into the JST plug on the other end. There are two LEDs - one red and one green. While charging, the red LED is lit. When the battery is fully charged and ready for use, the green LED turns on. Seriously, it could not get more easy.

    Charging is performed in three stages: first a preconditioning charge, then a constant-current fast charge and finally a constant-voltage trickle charge to keep the battery topped-up. The charge current is 100mA by default, so it will work with any size battery and USB port. If you want you can easily change it over to 500mA mode by soldering closed the jumper on the back, for when you'll only be charging batteries with 500mAh size or larger.

    For use with Adafruit LiPoly/LiIon batteries only! Other batteries may have different voltage, chemistry, polarity or pinout.
    • Comes assembled and tested with a free bonus JST cable!
    • 5V input via PCB-style USB connector
    • For charging single Lithium Ion/Lithium Polymer 3.7/4.2v batteries (not for older 3.6/4.1v cells)
    • 100mA charge current, adjustable to 500mA by soldering a jumper closed
    • Free 2-pin JST cable included!
    Batteries not included.
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    £5.75
  • Adafruit Sewing Needles - Pack of 20 (NEEDLES)
    Adafruit Sewing Needles

    Mighty needles, sew like the wind! This needle set is the only one you'll need for any sort of hand sewing, especially using our conductive thread and wearable electronics parts.

    Each pack contains 20 gold-eye sharps, with eye sizes ranging from #3 (1.75" long) to #9 (1.35" long). The two #3's (the largest) are too large to pass through the sewable coin cell holder but otherwise are easy to use and thread. The four #9's (the smallest) are a little difficult to thread so you may not want to use them with our conductive thread - they'll be easier to use with normal thread however. The remaining 14 needles are perfect for use with our 2-ply stainless conductive thread or stainless conductive thin yarn
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    £1.65
  • Adafruit PowerBoost 500 Basic - 500mA at 5V from LIPO (PBST500)
    Adafruit PowerBoost Basic - Provides 500mA at 5.2V from 1.8V to 5V

    PowerBoost is the perfect power supply for your portable project! This little DC/DC boost converter module can run from 1.8V batteries or higher, and convert that voltage to 5.2V DC for running your 5V projects. Like our popular 5V 1A USB wall adapter, we tweaked the output to be 5.2V instead of a straight-up 5.0V so that there's a little bit of 'headroom' long cables, high draw, the addition of a diode on the output if you wish, etc. The 5.2V is safe for all 5V-powered electronics like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, or Beagle Bone while preventing icky brown-outs during high current draw because of USB cable resistance.

    The PowerBoost 500 has at the heart a TPS61090 boost converter from TI. This boost converter chip has some really nice extras such as low battery detection, 2A internal switch, synchronous conversion, excellent efficiency, and 700KHz high-frequency operation. Check out these specs!

    • Synchronous operation means you can disconnect the output completely by connecting the ENable pin to ground. This will completely turn off the output
    • 2A internal switch (~2.5A peak limiting) means you can get 500mA+ from as low as 1.8V, 750mA+ from 2 NiMH or Alkaline batteries, and at least 1000mA from a 3.7V LiPoly/LiIon battery or 3 NiMH/Alkalines.
    • Low battery indicator LED lights up red when the voltage dips below 3.2V, optimized for the most common usage of LiPo/LiIon battery usage
    • On-board 500mA charge-rate 'Apple/iOS' data resistors. Solder in the included USB connector and you can plug in any iPhone or iPod for 500mA charge rate. Not suggested for iPad (which really needs 1A charge rate).
    • Full breakout for battery in, control pins and power out
    • 90%+ operating efficiency in most cases (see datasheet for efficiency graphs), and low quiescent current: 5mA when enabled and power LED is on, 20uA when disabled (power and low batt LED are off)
    Great for powering your robot, Arduino project, single-board-computer such as Raspberry Pi or BeagleBone! Each order comes with one fully assembled and tested PCB and a loose USB A jack. If you are powering your project from USB, solder the USB A jack in (a 3-minute soldering task). If you would like to use a terminal block, pick up a 3.5mm 2pin block and solder to the output spot where the USB jack would go. Or don't solder anything in for a more compact power pack.
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    £7.50
  • Adafruit PowerBoost 1000 Basic - 1000mA at 5V from LIPO (PBST1000)
    Adafruit PowerBoost Basic - Provides 1000mA at 5.2V from 1.8V to 5V

    PowerBoost is the perfect power supply for your power-hungry portable project! This little DC/DC boost converter module can run from 1.8V batteries or higher, and convert that voltage to 5.2V DC for running your 5V projects. With a beefy 4A DC/DC converter, it can give you 1A+ from as low as 2V. 

    Adafruit have tweaked the output to be 5.2V instead of a straight-up 5.0V so that there's a little bit of 'headroom' long cables, high draw, the addition of a diode on the output if you wish, etc. The 5.2V is safe for all 5V-powered electronics like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, or Beagle Bone while preventing icky brown-outs during high current draw because of USB cable resistance.

    The PowerBoost 1000 has at the heart a TPS61030 boost converter from TI. This boost converter chip has some really nice extras such as low battery detection, 4A internal switch, synchronous conversion, excellent efficiency, and 700KHz high-frequency operation. Check out these specs!

    • Synchronous operation means you can disconnect the output completely by connecting the ENable pin to ground. This will completely turn off the output
    • 4A internal switch means you can get 1000mA+ from as low as 1.8V, 1500mA+ from 2 NiMH or Alkaline batteries, and at least 2000mA from a 3.7V LiPoly/LiIon battery or 3 NiMH/Alkalines. Just make sure your batteries can actually supply the required 2-4A, OK?
    • Low battery indicator LED lights up red when the voltage dips below 3.2V, optimized for the most common usage of LiPo/LiIon battery usage
    • On-board 1000mA charge-rate 'Apple/iOS' data resistors. Solder in the included USB connector and you can plug in any iPhone or iPod for a speedy 1000mA charge rate. Works with iPads, both mini and 'classic' type.
    • Full breakout for battery in, control pins and power out
    • 90%+ operating efficiency in most cases (see datasheet for efficiency graphs), and low quiescent current: 5mA when enabled and power LED is on, 20uA when disabled (power and low batt LED are off)

    Great for powering your robot, Arduino project, single-board-computer such as Raspberry Pi or BeagleBone! Each order comes with one fully assembled and tested PCB, a loose 2-PH JST jack, a 2-pin Terminal block and a loose USB A jack.

    If you are powering your project from USB, solder the USB A jack in (a 3-minute soldering task). Then choose either JST for input (JST is often used for our LiIon batteries, but the connector is only rated for 2A) or a terminal block. 

    The 1000 version comes with a 2-pin terminal block so you can solder it to the output spot where the USB jack would go. Or don't solder any connectors in for a more compact power pack and go with 22AWG wires soldered directly in.

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    £11.25
  • Adafruit LiPo PowerBoost 500 & Charger - 500mA at 5V from 1.8 to 5V (PBST500C)
    Adafruit PowerBoost Charger - Provides 500mA at 5.2V from 1.8V to 5V

    PowerBoost 500 with charger is the perfect power supply for your portable project! With a built-in battery charger circuit, you'll be able to keep your project running even while recharging the battery! This little DC/DC boost converter module can be powered by any 3.7V LiIon/LiPoly battery, and convert the battery output to 5.2V DC for running your 5V projects.

    Adafruit tweaked the output to be 5.2V instead of a straight-up 5.0V so that there's a little bit of 'headroom' for long cables, high draw, the addition of a diode on the output if you wish, etc. The 5.2V is safe for all 5V-powered electronics like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, or Beagle Bone while preventing icky brown-outs during high current draw because of USB cable resistance.

    The PowerBoost 500C has at the heart a TPS61090 boost converter from TI. This boost converter chip has some really nice extras such as low battery detection, 2A internal switch, synchronous conversion, excellent efficiency, and 700KHz high-frequency operation. Check out these specs!

    • Synchronous operation means you can disconnect the output completely by connecting the ENable pin to ground. This will completely turn off the output
    • 2A internal switch (~2.5A peak limiting) means you can get 500mA+ from a 3.7V LiPoly/LiIon battery. We had no problem drawing 1000mA, just make sure your battery can handle it!
    • Low battery indicator LED lights up red when the voltage dips below 3.2V, optimized for LiPo/LiIon battery usage
    • Onboard 500mA charge-rate 'iOS' data resistors. Solder in the USB connector and you can plug in any iPhone or iPod for 500mA charge rate. Not suggested for large iPads.
    • Full breakout for battery in, control pins and power out
    • 90%+ operating efficiency in most cases (see datasheet for efficiency graphs), and low quiescent current: 5mA when enabled and power LED is on, 20uA when disabled (power and low batt LED are off)
    To make this even more useful, we stuck a MicroLipo charger on the other side. The charger circuitry is powered from a microUSB jack, and will recharge any 3.7V/4.2V LiIon or LiPoly battery at 500mA max rate. There's two LEDs for monitoring the charge rate, a yellow one tells you its working, a green one lights up when its done. You can charge and boost at the same time no problem, without any interruption on the output so its fine for use as a "UPS" (un-interruptable power supply) for a low-current draw device. Just be aware that the charge rate is 500mA max, so if you're drawing more than ~300mA continuously from the 5V output side, the battery will slowly drain since the charge rate is less than the dis-charge rate. For example, a Pi works fine but a BBB uses too much current for it to act like a UPS.

    Great for powering your robot, Arduino project, single-board-computer such as Raspberry Pi or BeagleBone! Each order comes with one fully assembled and tested PCB and a loose USB A jack. If you are powering your project from USB, solder the USB A jack in (a 3-minute soldering task). If you would like to use a terminal block, pick up a 3.5mm 2pin block and solder to the output spot where the USB jack would go. Or don't solder anything in for a more compact power pack.

    Each order comes with a fully assembled and tested PowerBoost 500C + USB jack. Does not come with a Lipoly or LiIon battery, but we have tons in the shop, just pick one with more than 500mAh of capacity. Also doesn't come with the nice iPhone or charger cable.  Be sure to read Adafruit's lovely tutorial for details, schematics, and more!
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    £10.45
  • Adafruit Sewable Snaps 5mm Diameter - Pack of 24 (SEWSNAPS)
    Adafruit Sewable Snaps

    The small 5mm size of these tin-plated brass snaps means they fit perfectly on Flora's pads! Snaps make a great connector for wearables-- solder one side to the board and sew the other to your project with conductive thread! This card comes with 24 complete snaps (socket and stud pairs).

    Some discoloration may occur during soldering. These snaps are washable, oxidation-resistant, and nonmagnetic
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    £3.30
  • Adafruit NeoPixels v2 - Pack of 4 Flora Smart Neo Pixels 24-Bit RGB LEDs (#1260)

    Adafruit Neo Pixels - Pack of 4, RGB LEDs (Model #1260)


    What's a wearable project without LEDs? Our favorite part of the Flora platform is these tiny smart pixels. Designed specifically for wearables, these updated Flora NeoPixels have ultra-cool technology: these ultra-bright LEDs have a constant-current driver cooked right into the LED package! The pixels are chainable - so you only need 1 pin/wire to control as many LEDs as you like. They're easy to sew, and the chainable design means no crossed threads.

    This is the second version of the Flora NeoPixels, which runs at at 'high speed' 800KHz communication. Unfortunately they are not back-compatible with the chip-on-back 'low speed' (400KHz) Flora NeoPixels. If you have a project that already uses low speed pixels, and you want to attach more pixels to the chain, you will need to purchase version 1's as these are not cross-compatible.

    These pixels have full 24-bit color ability with PWM taken care of by the controller chip. Since the LED is so bright, you need less current/power to get the effects you want. The driver is constant current so its OK if your battery power changes or fluctuates a little.

    Each pixel draws as much as 60mA (all three RGB LEDs on for full brightness white). In theory, the Flora can drive up to 500 pixels at 30 FPS (it will run out of RAM after that). However, after about 10 pixels (or if the distance between pixels is more than an inch or two) the resistance of the thread can affect the power supply. For large quantities of pixels over 10, you may want to consider using stranded core wire or copper braid to provide a "power bus" for the pixels - the current draw will add up fast!

    Each order comes with 4 individually controllable pixels.
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    £7.00
  • Adafruit Breadboard-Friendly RGB Smart NeoPixel - Pack of 4 with Headers (#1312)

    Adafruit Breadboard-Friendly NeoPixels - Pack of 4 (Model #1312)

    This is the easiest way possible to add small, bright RGB pixels to your project. We took the same technology from our Flora NeoPixels and made them breadboard friendly, with two rows of 3 x 0.1" spaced header on each side for easy soldering, chaining and breadboarding. These ultra-bright LEDs have a constant-current driver cooked right into the LED package! The pixels are chainable - so you only need 1 pin/wire to control as many LEDs as you like.

    These pixels have full 24-bit color ability with PWM taken care of by the controller chip. Since the LED is so bright, you need less current/power to get the effects you want. The driver is constant current so its OK if your battery power changes or fluctuates a little.

    Each pixel draws as much as 60mA (all three RGB LEDs on for full brightness white). An Arduino can drive up to 500 pixels at 30 FPS (it will run out of RAM after that). Using ribbon cable you can string these up to 6" apart (after that, you might get power droops and data corruption)

    Each order comes with 4 individually controllable pixels. In the photos below we show the pixels with headers soldered on. We include a 40-pin male header strip with each pack of 4

    Check out Adafruit's Arduino library at github which has some example code for driving the pixels at 800KHz
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    £7.00
  • Adafruit NeoPixel Matrix 8x8 - 64 RGB LED Pixel Matrix (ADA-NEOMATRIX)

    Adafruit NeoPixel Matrix - 64 RGB LEDs in 8x8 Matrix (Model #1487)

    Put on your sunglasses before wiring up this LED matrix - 64 eye-blistering RGB LEDs adorn the NeoMatrix from Adafruit for a blast of configurable color. Arranged in an 8x8 matrix, each pixel is individually addressable. Only one microcontroller pin is required to control all the LEDs, and you get 24 bit color for each LED.

    Wiring it up is easy: there are two 3-pin connection ports. Solder wires to the input port and provide 5VDC to the +5V and ground pins, then connect the DIN pin to your microcontroller. If you're using our NeoPixel Arduino library, use digital #6. You'll also need to make a common ground from the 5V power supply to the microcontroller/Arduino. Since each LED can draw as much as 60mA (thats up to 3.5 Amps per panel if all LEDs are on bright white!) we suggest our 5V 2A power supply. For most uses, you'll see about 1-2A of current per panel.

    If, say, you need MORE blinky, you can chain these together. For the second shield, connect the DIN connection to the first panel's DOUT. Also connect a ground pin together and power with 5V. There you go! You can chain as many as you'd like although after 4 or more panels you may run low on RAM if you're using an UNO. Watch your power usage too, you may need a 5V 10A power supply for so many of these!

    There is a single data line with a very timing-specific protocol. Since the protocol is very sensitive to timing, it requires a real-time microconroller such as an AVR, Arduino, PIC, mbed, etc. It cannot be used with a Linux-based microcomputer or interpreted microcontroller such as the netduino or Basic Stamp. Adafruit's wonderfully-written Neopixel library for Arduino supports these pixels! As it requires hand-tuned assembly it is only for AVR cores but others may have ported this chip driver code so please google around. An 8MHz or faster processor is required.

    Adafruit's detailed NeoPixel Uberguide has everything you need to use NeoPixels in any shape and size. Including ready-to-go library & example code for the Arduino UNO/Duemilanove/Diecimila, Flora/Micro/Leonardo, Trinket/Gemma, Arduino Due & Arduino Mega/ADK (all versions)
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    £26.65
  • Adafruit NeoPixel Quarter 60 Ring - 15 x WS2812 5050 RGB LED with Integrated Drivers (ADA-QRING15)

    Adafruit NeoPixel Quarter Ring - 15 x WS2812 5050 RGB LEDs (Model #1768)

    The biggest NeoPixel Ring yet! With four of these you can make a huge ring with 60 ultra bright smart LED NeoPixels are arranged in a circle with a 6.2" diameter. Each order comes with just the quarter ring. Four of this item are required to make a large ring. You will have to solder them together as well, so for the full ring of 60 LEDs, buy four and solder them together!

    The rings are 'chainable' - connect the output pin of one to the input pin of another. Use only one microcontroller pin to control as many as you can chain together! Each LED is addressable as the driver chip is inside the LED. Each one has ~18mA constant current drive so the color will be very consistent even if the voltage varies, and no external choke resistors are required making the design slim. Power the whole thing with 5VDC and you're ready to rock.

    There is a single data line with a very timing-specific protocol. Since the protocol is very sensitive to timing, it requires a real-time microcontroller such as an AVR, Arduino, PIC, mbed, etc. It cannot be used with a Linux-based microcomputer or interpreted microcontroller such as the netduino or Basic Stamp. Adafruit's wonderfully-written Neopixel library for Arduino supports these pixels! As it requires hand-tuned assembly it is only for AVR cores but others may have ported this chip driver code so please google around. An 8MHz or faster processor is required.

    Comes with one quarter ring of 15 x individually addressable RGB LEDs assembled and tested. We recommend you buy four to build the full circle as this is just the 1/4 of the circle.
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    £6.95
  • Adafruit 16-Channel PWM / Servo HAT for Raspberry Pi - Mini Kit (ADASERVOHAT)

    Description

    The Raspberry Pi is a wonderful little computer, but one thing it isn't very good at is controlling DC Servo Motors - these motors need very specific and repetitive timing pulses to set the position. Instead of asking the Pi Linux kernel to send these signals, pop on this handy HAT! It adds the capability to control 16 Servos with perfect timing. It can also do PWM up to 1.6 KHz with 12 bit precision, all completely free-running.

    For use with Raspberry Pi Model A+, B+, or Pi 2 can be used with the Model A or B if you use a tall 2x13 header instead of the included 2x20.

    The Adafruit 16-Channel 12-bit PWM/Servo HAT will drive up to 16 servos or PWM outputs over I2C with only 2 pins. The on-board PWM controller will drive all 16 channels simultaneously with no additional Raspberry Pi processing overhead. What's more, you can stack up to 62 of them to control up to 992 servos - all with the same 2 pins!

    Best of all, we even have a Python library you can use, so you'll be up and running instantly, to make your robotic creation com to life. The Adafruit PWM/Servo HAT is the perfect solution for any project that requires a lot of servos or PWM outputs! Please check out this detailed tutorial for lots more information including diagrams, schematics, installation instructions and more

    Each order comes with a Servo HAT, a 2-pin terminal block, four 3x4 headers and a 2x20 socket header. You'll need to do some light through-hole soldering to attach the headers onto the HAT circuit board, but its easy to do with basic soldering tools like a soldering iron and rosin core electronics solder. If you would like to stack multiple HATs onto one Pi, you can also pick up a 2x20 stacking header and a set of right-angle 3x4 headers that should be soldered on instead.

    Please note! This kit does not come with Raspberry Pi, servos, or required 5V power supply
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    £13.30
  • USB DIY Connector Shell - MicroB Plug (ADA1390)
    DIY Micro-USB Connector Shell

    Make your own USB connections without slicing apart a USB cable and soldering those thin wires inside.

    Each shell comes with a two-part snap plastic shell and a proper connector with easy-to-solder tabs
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    £1.00
  • Adafruit I2C ADS1115 16-Bit ADC 4 Channel with Programmable Gain Amplifier (ADA-ADC16)

    For microcontrollers without an analog-to-digital converter or when you want a higher-precision ADC, the ADS1115 provides 16-bit precision at 860 samples/second over I2C. The chip can be configured as 4 single-ended input channels, or two differential channels. As a nice bonus, it even includes a programmable gain amplifier, up to x16, to help boost up smaller single/differential signals to the full range. We like this ADC because it can run from 2V to 5V power/logic, can measure a large range of signals and its super easy to use. It is a great general purpose 16 bit converter.

    The chip's fairly small so it comes on a breakout board with ferrites to keep the AVDD and AGND quiet. Interfacing is done via I2C. The address can be changed to one of four options (see the datasheet table 5) so you can have up to 4 ADS1115's connected on a single 2-wire I2C bus for 16 single ended inputs.

    To get you started, we have example code for both the Raspberry Pi (in the Adafruit Pi Python library) and Arduino (in the ADS1X15 Arduino library repository) Simply connect GND to ground, VDD to your logic power supply, and SCL/SDA to your microcontroller's I2C port and run the example code to start reading data.

    Technical Details

    • WIDE SUPPLY RANGE: 2.0V to 5.5V
    • LOW CURRENT CONSUMPTION: Continuous Mode: Only 150µA Single-Shot Mode: Auto Shut-Down
    • PROGRAMMABLE DATA RATE: 8SPS to 860SPS
    • INTERNAL LOW-DRIFT VOLTAGE REFERENCE
    • INTERNAL OSCILLATOR
    • INTERNAL PGA
    • I2C INTERFACE: Pin-Selectable Addresses
    • FOUR SINGLE-ENDED OR TWO DIFFERENTIAL INPUTS
    • PROGRAMMABLE COMPARATOR
    • This board/chip uses I2C 7-bit addresses between 0x48-0x4B, selectable with jumpers.
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    £10.45
  • Adafruit PCB Ruler 15cm 6 inch (ADA-RULER)
    Bring out the inner Geek!

    The first time you soldered up a surface mount component you may have been surprised "these are really small parts!" and there's dozens of different names too! QFN, TDFN, SOIC, SOP, J-Lead, what do they mean and how can you tell how big they are? Now you can have a reference board at your fingertips, with this snazzy PCB reference ruler.

    Measuring approx 1" x 6", this standard-thickness FR4, gold plate ruler has the most common component packages you'll encounter. It also has font size guide, trace-width diagram, and a set of AWG-sized drills so you can gauge your wire thicknesses. Edges are labeled in inches with 1/8th marks and cm with 0.1cm marks.
    Add to Cart
    £3.30
  • Short 15cm Crocodile Alligator Test Leads. Ideal for Crumble - Pack of 12 (CROC12)
    Set of 12 Short Crocodile/Alligator Test Clips
    • 2 of each colour (Black, Red, Green, Yellow, White, Blue)
    • 15cm long
    • Ideal for use with Crumble
    Add to Cart
    £2.95
  • Adafruit 16-Channel 12-bit PWM/Servo Driver - I2C interface - PCA9685 (#815)
    You want to make a cool robot, maybe a hexapod walker, or maybe just a piece of art with a lot of moving parts. Or maybe you want to drive a lot of LEDs with precise PWM output. Then you realize that your microcontroller has a limited number of PWM outputs! What now? You could give up OR you could just get this handy PWM and Servo driver breakout.

    When we saw this chip, we quickly realized what an excellent add-on this would be. Using only two pins, control 16 free-running PWM outputs! You can even chain up 62 breakouts to control up to 992 PWM outputs (which we would really like to see since it would be glorious)
    • It's an i2c-controlled PWM driver with a built in clock. That means that, unlike the TLC5940 family, you do not need to continuously send it signal tying up your microcontroller, its completely free running!
    • It is 5V compliant, which means you can control it from a 3.3V microcontroller and still safely drive up to 6V outputs (this is good for when you want to control white or blue LEDs with 3.4+ forward voltages)
    • 6 address select pins so you can wire up to 62 of these on a single i2c bus, a total of 992 outputs - that's a lot of servos or LEDs
    • Adjustable frequency PWM up to about 1.6 KHz
    • 12-bit resolution for each output - for servos, that means about 4us resolution at 60Hz update rate
    • Configurable push-pull or open-drain output
    • Output enable pin to quickly disable all the outputs
    We wrapped up this lovely chip into a breakout board with a couple nice extras
    • Terminal block for power input (or you can use the 0.1" breakouts on the side)
    • Reverse polarity protection on the terminal block input
    • Green power-good LED
    • 3 pin connectors in groups of 4 so you can plug in 16 servos at once (Servo plugs are slightly wider than 0.1" so you can only stack 4 next to each other on 0.1" header
    • "Chain-able" design
    • A spot to place a big capacitor on the V+ line (in case you need it)
    • 220 ohm series resistors on all the output lines to protect them, and to make driving LEDs trivial
    • Solder jumpers for the 6 address select pins
    This product comes with a fully tested and assembled breakout as well as 4 pieces of 3x4 male straight header (for servo/LED plugs), a 2-pin terminal block (for power) and a piece of 6-pin 0.1" header (to plug into a breadboard). A little light soldering will be required to assemble and customize the board by attaching the desired headers but it is a 15 minute task that even a beginner can do.
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    £11.20
  • Adafruit Perma-Proto HAT for Pi Mini Kit - With EEPROM (ADAHATI)

    Description

    Design your own Raspberry Pi HAT, attach custom circuitry and otherwise dress your Pi A+ or B+ with this jaunty prototyping HAT kit with EEPROM

    To kick off the Adafruit HAT party, we have this Perma-Proto inspired plug in daughter board. It has a grid of 0.1" prototyping soldering holes for attaching chips, resistors, LED, potentiometers and more. The holes are connected underneath with traces to mimic the solderless breadboards you're familiar. There's also long power strips for +3V, +5V and Ground connections to the Pi. Near the top we break out nearly every pin you could want to connect to the Pi (#26 didnt quite make the cut).

    This is the fancier version of our Perma-Proto HAT.  It comes with a printed circuit board and a single 2x20 GPIO Header for Raspberry Pi to put your Perma-Proto on top of your Raspberry Pi (like a nice little hat...) This version comes with a blank 24C32 I2C EEPROM soldered on and connected to the EEDAT/EECLK lines so you cannot 'stack' it with other HATs. However, you can program in the EEPROM to make a self-identifying setup using the Pi Foundations' HAT specs - please note the specifications are still under development.

    You can customize your Perma-Proto setup using a standard 2x20 stacking header or extra tall 2x20 stacking header.

    A bit of light soldering is required to attach the header to the PCB but it's easy work.

    This hat is only compatible with the Raspberry Pi B+ or A+! It will not work with the Raspberry Pi Model A or B.

    The version we are shipping has the +3V and +5V markings in Red, and the GND markings in Blue

    Add to Cart
    £3.50
    £7.95
  • Diffused 5mm Fast Flashing RGB LED - Pack of 2 (LEDFKSHF)
    These are very interesting 5mm diffused RGB LEDs - instead of having 4 pins to control 3 LEDs, they have only two leads - power and ground. When powered, the LEDs perform a flashing effect with all the colours. See the video below for the timing and look. There is no way to change the 'program' or rate as it's burned into a little chip that is inside the LED itself. We also have a version that's a 'slow fading' RGB colour cycle.

    They're fairly bright LEDs, we guess its something around 1000 mcd total. They do diffuse nicely so you can the color changing from any angle. The forward voltage of the whole LED is about 3.4VDC but you can drive them from a lithium coin cell like a CR2032 and they'll just be a little dimmer. We don't have a datasheet showing the current draw over different voltages and colors but at the 'rated' 3.4V its approx 20mA and at 3.0V its approx 10mA.

    Comes in a pack of 2 LEDs. Although the LEDs are all the same shape and have the same basic program, due to manufacturing variables they will not sync together - they'll slowly drift in and out of sync
    Add to Cart
    £1.00
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